This week insideCTI: 9/12/10 – 9/18/10


Two major happenings this week with two major companies:

Microsoft finally got rid of the “14” moniker and chose the brand name “Lync,” a marriage of “link” and “sync” to underscore its enterprise communications capabilities. The exact release date? Still TBD. The last half of 2010 proves t0 be eventful for the Redmond Giant with the release of Kinect and Windows 7, and putting on the final touches for Windows Phone 7 (including a mock iPhone funeral), as well as offering the beta of Internet Explorer 9. So I guess I won’t be too surprised if Lync doesn’t come out until early 2011.

Avaya had something up its sleeve and it’s a $2,000 Android tablet, one component of what it brands the Flare Experience. Interestingly, Avaya avoided using “tablet” to describe anything within the realm of Flare. Obviously it wanted to distance itself as an Apple competitor or copycat. No matter, the iPad is still the tablet king, and any device that comes out to market without a keyboard will be compared to the iPad. It happened with the Cisco Cius and it will happen with the Avaya Flare tablet. How these enterprise focused tablets fare in the workplace remains to be seen…

Avaya also made the headlines by being the leader in global PBX market share. It bests Cisco by 3% with help from the $475 Nortel acquisition.

Other than company news, a guest post titled “Four simple rules for new technology evaluation” offered great practical advice on embracing a new technology for the enterprise. What stood out for me was Rule #1 — Buy early in the product life cycle. Most of the time we’re advised to avoid being the guinea pigs and field testers. “Let’s wait until the dot-five release” is something often overheard at management meetings. But from a cost standpoint this makes a lot of sense. The important thing is to keep expectations grounded in reality and perform as much due diligence as possible in finding and dealing with the technology vendor.

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